Space:1999 (Year One)

September 13th 1999: the freak explosion of atomic waste dumps blasts the Moon out of Earth orbit, hurling the 311 men and women of Moonbase Alpha into the far reaches of space.

Group Three/ITC/RAI

Produced: 1973-75

First UK broadcast: 4th September 1975

24 episodes x 50 minutes

Executive Producer: Gerry Anderson

Producer: Sylvia Anderson

Director of Photography: Frank WattsBSC

Production Designer: Keith Wilson

Story Consultant: Christopher Penfold

Script Editor: Edward di Lorenzoand Johnny Byrne

Moon City Costumes Designed by Rudi Gernreich

Special Effects Supervisor: Brian Johnson

Special Effects Director: Nick Allder

Music by Barry Gray

Additional Music: Tomaso Albinoni, Jack Arel and Pierre Dutour, Giampiero Boneschi, Paul Bonneau and Serge Lancen, Chuck CasseyFrank Cordell, Vic Elms, Alan Willis, Robert Farnon, Beda Folten, Mike HankinsonGustav Holst, Roger Roger, David SnellHarry Sosnik, Jim Sullivan and Georges Teperino

Episodes List
1 Breakaway

“A giant leap for mankind. It’s beginning to look like a stumble in the dark.”

September 9th 1999: Commander John Koenig arrives at Moonbase Alpha to supervise a manned probe mission to the newly discovered planet Meta. Nine astronauts have been killed by a mysterious illness and Dr. Helena Russell is convinced that radiation is the cause. An investigation of the Moon’s nuclear waste disposal areas reveals no sign of radiation leakage but intense heat is registered and Professor Victor Bergman suggests that increased magnetic output is the real threat. One of the nuclear waste areas explodes and the only way to avert a major disaster is to disperse the remaining nuclear waste canisters, but a sudden increase in magnetic radiation sets off a chain reaction which alters the Moon’s gravitational field and throws the satellite out of Earth orbit.

Screenplay by George Bellak and Christopher Penfold (George Bellak receives sole writing credit)

Directed by Lee H. Katzin

Filming Schedule:

Monday, 3rd – Friday, 21st December 1973

Thursday, 27th – Friday, 28th December 1973

Wednesday, 2nd – Friday, 11th January 1974

Friday, 22nd – Tuesday, 26th February 1974

Original UK Airdate: Thursday, 4th September 1975 (ATV)

Original Titles: “Zero G”, “The Void Ahead”,”Turning Point”

Edited by Dave Lane

Notes:

Filming began on Space:1999‘s premiere episode on Monday, November 5th 1973 with special effects shooting at Bray Studios. Principle photography began on L and M stages at Pinewood Studios a month later, on Monday, December 3rd 1973, and continued for six weeks (four weeks longer than scheduled). Three additional filming days were then required to complete the episode late in February 1974 at the end of filming on Black Sun. This was primarily due to director Lee H. Katzin’s insistence on filming each scene in the minutest detail, shooting scenes over and over again to capture reaction shots of each member of the cast. Originally contracted for the whole series, Katzin only directed one other episode (Black Sun) before he was ‘let go’. Katzin has previously worked with Martin Landau and Barbara Bain on Mission: Impossible and had also directed episodes of Branded, The Wild,Wild West, RatPatrol, Mannix, It Takes A Thief and Police Story. He went on to direct episodes of The Quest, The Man From Atlantis, The Yellow Rose, Automan, Miami Vice and The Young Riders.

Lon Satton, previously seen as C.I.A. agent Harold Strutter in Live And Let Die (1973), was originally intended to be a series regular as Benjamin Ouma, but other members of the cast found him difficult to work with and he was not re-contracted for further episodes.

Breakaway was originally scripted as a 90-minute episode by George Bellak who takes sole on-screen writer’s credit, although his script was completely re-written by Christopher Penfold.

Additional Cast:

  • Commissioner Gerald Simmonds Roy Dotrice
  • Commander Gorski Philip Madoc
  • Benjamin Ouma Lon Satton
  • Eddie Collins Eric Carte
  • GTV Newsreader Don Fellows
  • Jim Nordstrom Roy Scammell
  • Steiner Alf Joint
  • Main Mission Operatives Loftus Burton, Chai LeePaul Weston
  • Norma West Valerie Van Ost
  • Security Guards Tony Allyn, Quentin Pierre
  • Eagle Stewardess Laurie Davis
  • Voice of Eagle Pilot Shane Rimmer
2 Matter of Life and Death

“You face power beyond your understanding. It will destroy you.”

An Eagle returns from a reconnaissance flight to the planet Terra Nova with the pilots catatonic and an extra man on board. Helena identifies him as her husband, Lee Russell, the pilot of Astro 7 lost in the vicinity of Jupiter in 1994. However, examination of Russell shows peculiarities in his life signs and Professor Bergman determines that he is gradually turning into anti-matter! In obvious distress, Russell warns the Alphans to stay away from the planet, but is unable to explain why. Inexplicably, the man dies and his body disappears. Disregarding Russell’s warnings, Koenig and Helena lead a landing party to Terra Nova where they find a paradise environment, perfect for the Alphans. But disaster strikes when the planet apparently turns against them…

Screenplay by Art Wallace, Johnny Byrne

Directed by Charles Crichton

Filming Schedule: Monday, 14th – Wednesday, 30th January 1974

Original UK Airdate: Thursday, 27th November 1975 (ATV)

Edited by Derek Hyde Chambers

Original Title: “The Siren Planet”

Notes:

Charles Crichton directs the first of fourteen episode of Space:1999, more than any other director working on the series. A British Film Industry legend, Crichton began his career as an editor on Sanders Of The River (1935) and went on to work on Things To Come (1936) and The Thief Of Bagdad (1940) before graduating to director, making his feature film directorial debut on For Those In Peril (1944). His best-known works are the Ealing comedies The Lavender Hill Mob (1951) and The Titfield Thunderbolt (1953) and, more recently, his last feature film A Fish Called Wanda (1988). Throughout the 1960s and 70s, he worked extensively in filmed television as well, directing episodes of Danger Man, Man Of The World, The Avengers, Man In A Suitcase, Strange Report, Dick Turpin, Return Of The Saint, Smuggler and The Professionals. He had previously worked for Gerry Anderson on the second season of The Protectors.

Although writer Art Wallace receives the primary credit for the screenplay, his original script was unworkable and had to be completely re-written by Johnny Byrne. Wallace had previously written Obsession and Assignment: Earth for Star Trek’s second season.

Clifton Jones makes his series debut as David Kano, replacing Lon Satton who had appeared as Benjamin Ouma in Breakaway.

Although the second episode to go before the cameras, the incidental music for this episode was composed and recorded first. Some of the music featured in this episode was originally recorded in 1966 for the ‘Alan’s dream’ sequence in the Thunderbirds Are Go feature film.

The episode reveals that a total evacuation of Alpha will take 48 hours.

Additional Cast:

  • Lee Russell Richard Johnson
  • Parks Stuart Damon
  • Bannion John Oxley
  • Main Mission Operatives Jeremy Anthony, Loftus Burton, Andrew Dempsey, Chai Lee, Christopher Matthews, Michael Stevens
  • Security Guards Tony Allyn, Quentin Pierre
  • Medics Saad Ghazi, Christopher Williams
  • Voice of Eagle Pilot Shane Rimmer
3 Black Sun

“Do you have any idea what’ll happen to us inside the black sun?”

“Whatever it is, I just hope it’s interesting.”

The Moon is drawn inexorably towards a black sun, an area of intense gravitational pull that is the remains of a collapsed stellar mass. A reconnaissance Eagle is torn apart by the phenomenon and Koenig estimates that the Alphans have only three days before they suffer the same fate! Bergman designs a force shield which offers a slim chance for those on the base but Koenig also elects to launch a survival Eagle with a crew of six, in the hope that they might escape the pull of the sun and find a planet to live on. As the Moon plunges into the sun, Koenig and Bergman become discorporeal and meet an omnipotent being who reveals the secrets of the universe…

Screenplay by David Weir

Directed by Lee H. Katzin

Filming Schedule: Thursday, 31st January – Thursday, 21st February 1974

Original UK Airdate: Thursday, 6th November 1975 (ATV)

Edited by Mike Campbell

Notes:

Martin Landau, Barbara Bain and Barry Morse have all cited this episode as their favourite of the whole series. It was intended to be shown very early in the series’ run (ideally as episode two), as the conclusion serves as a device to get the Moon out of the Solar System and hundreds of light years from Earth into regions of space where stars and planetary systems are much closer together. Unfortunately, on original transmission Black Sun was shown as episode ten, by which time viewers had already seen the Alphans visiting other star systems and habitable planets – consequently, the series suffered from adverse criticism for scientific inaccuracy. The episode also introduces the concept of an omnipotent being who is guiding the Alphans’ journey towards some unknown destiny.

It is revealed that Victor Bergman has a mechanical heart, which saves his life here when he is electrocuted.

Some of the themes of this episode were later explored by Gerry Anderson and Johnny Byrne in the 1975 TV pilot The Day After Tomorrow.

Additional Cast:

  • Mike Ryan Paul Jones
  • Smitty Jon Laurimore
  • Toshira Fujita Vincent Wong
  • Main Mission Operatives Loftus Burton, Andrew Dempsey, Chai Lee, Michael Stevens, Marc Zuber
  • Security Guards Tony Allyn, Quentin Pierre
4 Ring around the Moon

“Earthmen – do not resist. You are the captives of the planet Triton.”

Maintenance engineer Ted Clifford is struck by an energy beam which transforms his brain into a computer relay station for an alien probe which captures the Moon within an energy ring. When Clifford’s mind burns out, the probe seeks a new relay and a medical mission on the lunar surface provides it with the opportunity to capture Dr. Helena Russell. She later returns to Alpha, apparantly unharmed, but is revealed to be relaying information from the Alpha computer through an energy implant in her brain. In an attempt to free Helena from the probe’s control before she suffers the same fate as Clifford, Koenig and Carter board the probe and discover that the computerised device is on a pre-programmed mission to destroy the human race!

Screenplay by Edward di Lorenzo

Directed by Ray Austin

Edited by Derek Hyde Chambers

Filming Schedule: Wednesday, 27th February – Thursday, 14th March 1974

Original UK Airdate: Thursday, 15th January 1976 (ATV)

Notes:

Ray Austin directs the first of nine episodes of Space:1999. A former stuntman and fight choreographer, Austin turned his hand to directing on The Avengers and went on to direct episodes of The Saint, Department S, Randall And Hopkirk Deceased, The New Avengers and The Professionals. In the 1980s, he established himself in American television directing episodes of Salvage 1, Magnum p.i., Tales Of The Gold Monkey, Airwolf, Alfred Hitchock Presents, Highlander, Heaven Help Us, JAG and CI5: The New Professionals.

Formerly with the band Christie (of “Yellow River” fame), Vic Elms is credited as Music Associate on every Year One episode, although his only compositions for the series’ incidentals feature in this instalment. The son-in-law of producer Sylvia Anderson, Elms had previously provided the music for Gerry Anderson’s unseen series pilot The Investigator and arranged the electric guitar section of Space:1999‘s title music (an electric guitar arrangement by Elms of the series’ theme can also be heard in Matter Of Life And Death). However, as music editor Alan Willis discovered to his dismay, although he could compose pop songs, Elms was unable to read music or understand the requirements of scoring music to cues for film incidentals. The majority of the scoring for the episode was completed by Willis, who also conducted the orchestra at the recording session. Elms was not invited to contribute to any further episodes.

Additional Cast:

  • Ted Clifford Max Faulkner
  • Main Mission Operatives Andrew Dempsey, Robert Philips, Michael Stevens
  • Security Guards Tony Allyn, Quentin Pierre
  • Voice of Triton Prentis Hancock
5 Earthbound

“Hello, Earth. Hello, Earth. This is Commissioner Simmonds returning home after 75 years.”

A Kaldorian spaceship en route to Earth crashes on the Moon and the Alphans find a crew of six on board in suspended animation. Their attempt to revive the crew accidentally kills one, but the surviving Kaldorians are understanding and a peaceful cultural exchange takes place. Koenig proposes that one Alphan could accompany the Kaldorians to Earth in the now vacant casket, and Captain Zantor agrees to the plan, stipulating that the chosen Alphan will have to be tested for compatibility with the Kaldorian suspended animation technology. The computer is set the task of choosing the one person who will return home, but Simmonds takes matters into his own hands, breaking into the power station and threatening to destroy Alpha unless he becomes the Kaldorians’ passenger.

Screenplay by Anthony Terpiloff

Directed by Charles Crichton

Filming Schedule: Friday, 15th March – Monday, 1st April 1974

Original UK Airdate: Thursday, 4th December 1975 (ATV)

Edited by Mike Campbell

Notes:

This was the first episode to feature Barry Morse on-screen in the opening titles.

The white wig worn here by Christopher Lee was later passed on to be worn by Peter Cushing (in Missing Link), Margaret Leighton (in Collision Course), Leo McKern (in The Infernal Machine) and Joan Collins (in Mission Of The Darians). The wig actually starts to fall off as Zantor lays down in his casket towards the end of the episode, revealing Lee’s dark hair underneath.

During the chilling final scene when Simmonds awakes to find himself trapped in the casket, one of the Kaldorians in the background appears to react to Simmonds’ screams and sits up!

Earthbound has the distinction of being the only Year One episode not to be novelised by Futura Books, although certain elements of the story were incorporated into “The Space Guardians” by Brian Ball. However, the complete episode was novelised by E.C. Tubb in October 2001 and published by Fanderson’s Century 21 Books imprint in 2003 as part of their Earthbound novel.

Additional Cast:

  • Captain Zantor Christopher Lee
  • Commissioner Gerald Simmonds Roy Dotrice
  • Main Mission Operatives June Bolton, Sarah Bullen,Loftus Burton, Andrew Dempsey, Robert Philips
  • Security Guards Tony Allyn, Quentin Pierre
  • Female Kaldorian Rhonda Parker
6 Another Time, Another Place

“I knew you didn’t die. I knew.”

The Moon passes through a rift in space and Regina Kesslann is badly effected by the experience. She develops the symptoms of sunburn and suffers an emotional breakdown when she discovers that John Koenig and Alan Carter are still alive – particularly Carter, to whom she believes she is married. Incredibly, the Moon returns to Earth, but an identical Moon is already in the planet’s orbit. Regina dies suddenly and an autopsy reveals that she has two brains! Koenig and Carter visit the doppelgänger Moon where they find an abandoned Moonbase Alpha and a crashed Eagle with their own bodies at the controls. Realising that they have travelled through time and caught up with their future selves, Koenig leads a team to Earth to discover the final fate of the Alphan survivors…

Screenplay by Johnny Byrne

Directed by David Tomblin

Filming Schedule:

Tuesday, 2nd – Friday, 19th April 1974

Tuesday, 23rd – Thursday, 25th April 1974 (2nd Unit)

Original UK Airdate: Thursday, 18th December 1975 (ATV)

Edited by Derek Hyde Chambers

Notes:

This episode marks the series debut of director David Tomblin who was brought in to the series to replace outgoing director Lee H. Katzin. One of the film industry’s most sought-after assistant directors, Tomblin’s previous work included such films as Taste Of Fear (1961), The Haunting (1963), Murder Ahoy (1964) and Shaft In Africa (1973), although he had also directed series television including episodes of The Prisoner (on which he also served as producer), and both UFO and The Protectors for Gerry Anderson. As first assistant director and second unit director, Tomblin has subsequently worked on Barry Lyndon (1975), The Omen (1976), A Bridge Too Far (1977), Superman (1978), The Empire Strikes Back (1980), Raiders Of The Lost Ark (1981), Return Of The Jedi (1983), Never Say Never Again (1983), Indiana Jones And The Temple Of Doom (1984), Out Of Africa (1985), Indiana Jones And The Last Crusade (1989), Braveheart (1995) and The Man In The Iron Mask (1998).

The episode also features the first complete original screenplay by Johnny Byrne who replaced Edward di Lorenzo as the series’ script editor.

For split-screen scenes on the future Earth, Zienia Merton played the duplicate Dr. Russell opposite Barbara Bain on the studio floor – her side of the screen was masked off and double-exposed when the two actresses swapped position to create the effect of two Helenas talking to each other.

Nick Tate has often cited this as his favourite episode of the series.

Additional Cast:

  • Regina Kesslann Judy Geeson
  • Main Mission Operatives June Bolton, Loftus Burton, Andrew Dempsey, Robert Philips, Michael Stevens
  • Security Guard Tony Allyn
7 Missing Link

“It is not a dream, but all very real I assure you.”

Koenig is critically injured when his Eagle crashes on the lunar surface. Apparently in a coma and relying on life-support to sustain him, Koenig awakes to find himself transported to a city of light on the planet Zenno where Raan, an alien scientist, believes him to be the missing link of the loveless Zennite people. Initially reticent to comply with Raan’s experiments, Koenig is seduced by the scientist’s beautiful daughter Vana, and begins to have second thoughts of returning to Alpha, opting for a peaceful, immortal existence on Zenno, free at last of the constant fight for survival. Back on Alpha, however, Koenig’s body is dying and the command structure is breaking down – without Koenig to lead the Alphans, the base is falling apart!

Screenplay by Edward di Lorenzo

Directed by Ray Austin

Filming Schedule:

Monday, 22nd April – Thursday, 9th May 1974

Monday, 22nd July 1974 (2nd Unit)

Original UK Airdate: Thursday, 22nd January 1976 (ATV)

Edited by Mike Campbell

Notes:

Some of the incidental music in this episode was composed and recorded in 1963 for the Stingray episode Ghost Of The Sea. The track of electronic organ music used for “Vana’s Theme” was originally composed by Barry Gray and Alan Willis for Breakaway as a theme for establishing shots of Moonbase Alpha – unused in the completed episode, it makes its sole appearance in the series here. In some shots of the medical monitors, Koenig’s name is incorrectly spelled “KEONIG”.

Additional Cast:

  • Raan Peter Cushing
  • Vana Joanna Dunham
  • Main Mission Operatives June Bolton, Andrew DempseyRobert Philips
  • Security Guard Tony Allyn
8 Guardian of Piri

“Leave me with my pain. It reminds me I’m human.”

The Alpha Main Computer falls under the control of the Guardian of Piri and reports that Piri is the perfect world that the Alphans have been looking for. When an Eagle crew go missing on the planet, Koenig leads a search party and discovers that Piri is completely lifeless. Locating the missing men, he finds them unwilling to leave, and back on Alpha he is betrayed by his colleagues who have succumbed to the Guardian’s influence and set about the complete evacuation of the base. Taunted by the Guardian’s beautiful servant, Koenig returns to the planet, determined to reveal the truth to his people about life on Piri…

Screenplay by Christopher Penfold (uncredited)

Story by David Weir

Directed by Charles Crichton

Edited by Derek Hyde Chambers

Filming Schedule: Friday, 10th – Tuesday, 28th May 1974

Original UK Airdate: Thursday, 13th November 1975 (ATV)

Original Title: “Nobody’s Perfect”

Notes:

The episode features the first complete original screenplay by Christopher Penfold, who is credited as ‘story consultant’ on the in-show titles but, oddly, not as the scriptwriter. Keith Wilson’s remarkable designs for the planet Piri resulted from discussions with Penfold about a play called “Spawn” that he had written for LWT, in which one of the main characters was a sculptor who filled the front garden of a country house with a sculpture that looked like pieces of frogspawn.

Catherine Schell makes her Space:1999 debut in this episode, albeit in a different role from that in which she was to appear as a regular in Year Two.

The New Avengers star Gareth Hunt is seen briefly (and uncredited) as an Eagle pilot in scenes at the end of the episode as the Alphans flee Piri. His role was originally intended to be much larger, but he had a disagreement with director Charles Crichton and left the production before the episode was completed.

Kano is revealed to have a complex of fibre sensors implanted in the cortex of his brain so that he can be linked to Main Computer.

The incidental ‘theme’ for Piri is “Undersea” composed by Chuck Cassey, a track from the Chappell Recorded Music Library.

Additional Cast:

  • Servant of the Guardian Catherine Schell
  • Peter Irving Michael Culver
  • Eagle Co-Pilot John Lee-Barber
  • Ken Johnson James Fagan
  • Main Mission Operatives June Bolton, Loftus Burton,Andrew Dempsey, Christine Donna, Raymond Harris, Michael Stevens
  • Security Guard Tony Allyn
  • Eagle Pilot Gareth Hunt
  • Ed Davis John Gleeson
  • Sarah Graham Anne Henson
  • Technician Trevor Ainsley
  • Nurses Juliet King, Jodi Sherwood/Willow
9 Force of Life

“You could accept a freak electrical discharge from space once – but not twice!”

A ball of blue light approaches Alpha and while the personnel are suspended in time, the light invades the body of technician Anton Zoref. Everything apparently returns to normal but massive energy losses are recorded and Koenig begins to suspect that Zoref may be the cause. Possessed with a consuming need for heat, Zoref draws it from any source, human or otherwise, as he rampages through the base leaving a trail of dead bodies and useless equipment in his wake. Koenig orders power supplies to be cut in an attempt to deprive Zoref of light and warmth, but Zoref heads for the nuclear generating area…

Screenplay by Johnny Byrne

Directed by David Tomblin

Filming Schedule:

Wednesday, 29th May – Friday, 7th June 1974

Monday, 1st July – Friday, 5th July 1974

Original UK Airdate: Thursday, 11th September 1975 (ATV)

Edited by Alan Killick

Original Title: “Force Of Evil”

Notes:

This episode relies heavily on three pieces of electronic music from the Chappell Recorded Music Library: “Cosmic Sounds No. 1”, “Cosmic Sounds No. 3” and “Videotronics No. 3” all composed by Roger Roger (aka Cecil Leuter) and Georges Teperino (aka Nino Nardini). The piped music heard in the Alpha solarium is “The Latest Fashion” by Giampiero Boneschi, also from Chappell’s.

Additional Cast:

  • Anton Zoref Ian McShane
  • Eva Zoref Gay Hamilton
  • Mark Dominix John Hamill
  • Jane Eva Rueber-Staier
  • Main Mission Operatives June Bolton, Loftus Burton,Sarah Bullen, Andrew Dempsey, Raymond Harris
  • Security Guards Tony Allyn, Quentin Pierre
  • Medic Vincent Wong
  • Nurse Maureen Tan
10 Alpha Child

“I saw him smile. It sent a shiver up my spine. So knowing – almost as if he were mocking his mother’s death.”

The first child born on the Moon inexplicably grows to the size of a five year old within a matter of hours and Koenig believes that the child’s unnatural development is linked to the death of his father, a technician in the nuclear generating plant. Then four spaceships appear over Alpha, menacing the base and resisting all attempts to repel them. Jackie suddenly grows into a mature adult, revealing himself to be Jarak, one of 120 alien travellers who seek physical forms in which to conceal their identities and escape the rigorously imposed genetic conformity of their home planet. He and his companions intend to inhabit the Alphans’ bodies, which they can only do at the moments of birth and death…

Screenplay by Christopher Penfold, Edward di Lorenzo (Christopher Penfold receives sole writing credit)

Directed by Ray Austin

Filming Schedule: Monday, 8th – Monday, 22nd July 1974

Original UK Airdate: Thursday, 16th October 1975 (ATV)

Edited byDerek Hyde Chambers

Notes:

The original script of this episode was written by Edward di Lorenzo but re-written by Christopher Penfold who receives sole credit.

Some of the incidental music in this episode was originally composed and recorded in 1969 for the The Secret Service episode Last Train To Bufflers Halt.

Prentis Hancock has a nasty bruise under the nail of his forefinger which is still visible in The Last Sunset.

Barry Morse took some time off during filming of this episode and appears in only a couple of short scenes.

Additional Cast:

  • Jarak Julian Glover
  • Sue Crawford/Rena Cyd Hayman
  • Jackie Crawford Wayne Brooks
  • Joan Conway Rula Lenska
  • Ken Johnson James Fagan
  • Main Mission Operatives Loftus Burton, Sarah Bullen, Andrew Dempsey, Raymond Harris, Michael Stevens, Maureen Tan
  • Security Guards Tony Allyn, Quentin Pierre
  • Medic Vincent Wong
11 The Last Sunset

“If this is the end of one life, we have to start to build a new one – to live like human beings again.”

As the Moon approaches the planet Ariel, hundreds of alien devices land on the lunar surface. Fearing an attack, the Alphans are surprised when the devices emit oxygen and turn the Moon into an atmosphere-rich world with blue skies and a warm sun. The Alphans enjoy their new-found freedom on the lunar surface and Helena leads a reconnaissance team to scout for a new settlement on higher ground, but their Eagle is caught in a violent storm and crashes, stranding them miles from Alpha. As search parties attempt to locate the missing Eagle, Koenig and Bergman realise that the Moon is not going into orbit around Ariel – without sunlight, the atmosphere will shrink into an icecap and Alpha will be crushed!

Screenplay by Christopher Penfold

Directed by Charles Crichton

Filming Schedule: Tuesday, 23rd July – Tuesday, 6th August 1974 plus Wednesday, 21st August 1974

Original UK Airdate: Thursday, 1st January 1976 (ATV)

Edited by Alan Killick

Notes:

Prentis Hancock cites this as his favourite episode of the series, as he was given considerably more to do than usual. The actors relished the opportunity to get outside the confines of the Pinewood Studios soundstages and into the open air, even if it was only into the backlot where the scenes of the Alphans greeting the Moon’s first rainfall were filmed. This sequence was shot two weeks after principal photography on the episode had been completed, during filming of Voyager’s Return.

Alpha appears to have an extremely unusual design feature for a base sited in the airless vacuum of the lunar surface when Koenig is seen opening one of the windows in technical section. However, in a short sequence cut from the original script, technicians were to be seen specially fitting this new opening window in technical section, as the Alphans fully expected the Moon’s new atmosphere to be permanent. Later, when it becomes apparent that this is not so, another omitted sequence had Koenig ordering the new windows to be replaced immediately.

Much of the incidental music in this episode was originally composed and recorded by Barry Gray for earlier Gerry Anderson productions: the Stingray episode Raptures Of The Deep, the Thunderbird 6 feature film, the Joe 90 episode King For A Day and The Secret Service‘s A Case For The Bishop. One piece was originally recorded as a library track for Supercar in October 1960, fourteen years earlier!

Additional Cast:

  • Ken Johnson James Fagan
  • Main Mission Operatives Loftus Burton, Sarah Bullen,Andrew Dempsey, Robert Philips, Michael Stevens, Maureen Tan, Lynda Westover
  • Security Guard Quentin Pierre
  • Alphans Richard Adams, Janet Allen, Guy Francis Groen, Jack McKenzie, Linzy Scott,Anita West
12 Voyager's Return

“This is the voice of Voyager One. Greetings from the people of the planet Earth.”

Alpha encounters Voyager One, an Earth probe ship launched in 1985. Due to a tragic miscalculation in the design of the ship’s Queller Drive engine, Voyager has spent the last fifteen years polluting space with toxic fast neutrons which will destroy Alpha unless the Drive can be shut down! Koenig turns to Dr. Ernst Linden to come up with a scheme to override the probe’s security codes and deactivate the Queller Drive, and Linden confesses that he is the only man capable of doing so, for he is really Ernst Queller, designer of the fatal drive unit. Linden successfully shuts down the probe’s engine but then a greater menace appears in the form of three Sidon spacecraft, seeking revenge for the destruction that Voyager One has wrought upon their worlds.

Screenplay by Johnny Byrne

Directed by Bob Kellett

Filming Schedule: Wednesday, 7th – Monday, 26th August 1974

Original UK Airdate: Thursday, 9th October 1975 (ATV)

Edited by Derek Hyde Chambers

Notes:

This episode marks the series debut of director Bob Kellett, the temporary replacement for David Tomblin while he was engaged on Barry Lyndon (1975). Kellett made a noted film debut as the director of A Home Of Your Own (1964), but prior to his Space:1999 work he was best-known for a series of bawdy comedies, including Up The Chastity Belt (1971), Up The Front (1972) and The Garnett Saga (1972). Post-1999, he directed Spanish Fly (1976) and Are You Being Served? (1977).

Some of the incidental music in this episode was originally composed by Barry Gray for the Thunderbirds episode 30 Minutes After Noon, the Thunderbird 6 feature film and the The Secret Service episode Last Train To Bufflers Halt.

Additional Cast:

  • Ernst Linden Jeremy Kemp
  • Jim Haines Barry Stokes
  • Aarchon Alex Scott
  • Steve Abrams Lawrence Trimble
  • Main Mission Operatives Loftus Burton, Sarah Bullen, Andrew Dempsey, Robert Philips, Michael Stevens
  • Security Guards Tony Allyn, Quentin Pierre
  • Technicians Laurie Davis, Al Flemyng,Anita West
13 Collision Course

“I go to shape the future of eternity. And I need your help.”

Carter is caught in the explosion of an asteroid but is saved by the intervention of an aged alien woman named Arra. Koenig and Morrow rescue him but discover that the Moon is on a collision course with the planet Atheria, 34 times the size of the Moon. Bergman determines that the only way to avoid the collision is to detonate a chain of nuclear mines in space so that the resulting shockwave will alter the Moon’s course. An alien ship appears between the Moon and Atheria and when Koenig investigates he meets Arra who tells him that their destinies are predetermined and her people have awaited the Moon’s arrival for millenia: to bring about a great mutation in Arra’s people, the Moon and Atheria must be allowed to collide!

Screenplay by Anthony Terpiloff

Directed by Ray Austin

Filming Schedule: Tuesday, 27th August – Tuesday, 10th September 1974

Original UK Airdate: Thursday, 18th September 1975 (ATV)

Edited by Alan Killick

Notes:

Arra’s throne proved to be a versatile piece of furniture – it later appeared as Companion’s bed in The Infernal Machine and The Archon’s throne in The Dorcons.

Arra’s ship appears again in The Metamorph – it is one of the alien ships lying in the spaceship graveyard on Psychon.

Some of the incidental music in this episode was originally composed by Barry Gray for the Captain Scarlet episode Codename Europa, the Thunderbird 6 feature film and the Joe 90 episodes Operation McClaine, Big Fish, Business Holiday, Arctic Adventure and Trial At Sea.

Additional Cast:

  • Arra Margaret Leighton
  • Steve Abrams Lawrence Trimble
  • Main Mission Operatives Vic Armstrong, Loftus Burton,Sarah Bullen, Andrew Dempsey, Annie Lambert, Michael Stevens
  • Security Guards Tony Allyn, Quentin Pierre
  • Nurse Laurie Davis
14 Death's other Dominion

“A death on Thule would be a marvellous thing.”

After receiving an invitation to visit the frozen planet of Ultima Thule, Koenig, Helena, Bergman and Carter land on the surface and soon find themselves lost in a blizzard. Carter manages to make his way back to the Eagle while the others are rescued by the survivors of the Uranus Expeditionary Probe of 1986, believed to have been lost in a proton storm. The Alphans meet Dr. Cabot Rowland who reveals that his group have survived on Ultima Thule for 880 years and none has aged a single day! Now they are attempting to rebuild their damaged ship and Rowland fosters dreams of travelling the stars as an immortal god. He invites the Alphans to give up their lunar home and join them on Thule, but Koenig learns his terrible secret…

Screenplay by Anthony Terpiloff, Elizabeth Barrows

Directed by Charles Crichton

Filming Schedule: Wednesday, 11th September – Monday, 23rd September 1974

Original UK Airdate: Thursday, 2nd October 1975 (ATV)

Edited by Derek Hyde Chambers

Notes:

During filming, Martin Landau and Barbara Bain flatly refused to work on the ice cavern set until specialists confirmed that the fumes it gave off were non-toxic. Chemicals in the snow used in the blizzard scene took the top layer of skin off Landau’s face.

Some of the incidental music in this episode was originally composed by Barry Gray for the Thunderbirds episode 30 Minutes After Noon and the Joe 90 episode Big Fish.

Additional Cast:

  • Cabot Rowland Brian Blessed
  • Colonel Jack Tanner John Shrapnel
  • Freda Mary Miller
  • Ted David Ellison
  • Thule Girl Valerie Leon
  • Main Mission Operatives Loftus Burton, Sarah Bullen,Andrew Dempsey, Annie Lambert, Robert Philips
  • Thulians Glenda Allen, Barbara Bermel, Laurie Davis, Jenny Devenish, Tony Houghton, Carolyn Hudson, John Lee-Barber, Annette Linden, David MurphyEddy Nedari, Michael Ryan, Jack ShepherdSuzette St. Clair
  • Revered Ones Adrienne Burgess, Lesley Collet, Robert Driscoll, Margaret Lawley, Terry Rendle, Ian RuskinEllen Sheehan
15 The Full Circle

“Oh, God, what has happened? What is happening to me? You must know me!”

Eagle Six returns to Alpha after a reconnaissance mission to the planet Retha, but the crew are missing and the only occupant is a dead cave man. Koenig and Helena lead a rescue team to the planet but they too go missing. Carter is attacked by primitive humans and Sandra is kidnapped and taken to the primitives’ cave dwelling where the cave chief takes an interest in her. As a fight breaks out over her, Sandra realises with horror that the chief and his mate are Koenig and Helena, somehow regressed to a primitive Cro Magnon state. She smashes a rock on the chief’s head and escapes into the woods, pursued by the primatives. Discovering the cave dwelling, Bergman, Kano and Carter disturb a ceremony for the injured cave chief. The cave people scatter and Carter gives chase, unaware that the primitives he intends to shoot down to rescue Sandra are his Alphan colleagues.

Screenplay by Jesse Lasky Jnr, Pat Silver

Directed by Bob Kellett

Filming Schedule: Tuesday, 24th September – Tuesday, 8th October 1974

Original UK Airdate: Thursday, 11th December 1975 (ATV)

Edited by Alan Killick

Notes:

Scenes on the planet Retha were shot on the backlot at Pinewood Studios and in Black Park next door – this was the only location filming during Space:1999‘s first season and the only exterior filming apart from the rainfall sequence in The Last Sunset.

Director Bob Kellett reports that Barbara Bain relished the opportunity to “get down and dirty” in her cavewoman persona and would spend lunchtimes in her trailer practicing her animal-like screaming.

The percussive incidental music featured in this episode was Barry Gray’s final contribution to the series, and his last work for Gerry Anderson.

Additional Cast:

  • Spearman Oliver Cotton
  • Main Mission Operatives Sarah Bullen, Andrew Dempsey,Annie Lambert, Robert Philips, Michael Stevens
  • Security Guard Tony Allyn
  • Nurse Chai Lee
  • Caveman Alan Meacham
16 End of Eternity

“How can you value life if you do not fear death?”

Investigating a passing asteroid which appears to have an internal atmosphere, the Alphans blast their way into a living chamber inside. The explosion critically injures the only occupant who is returned to Alpha even though Helena feels that he cannot be saved. However, the alien makes a miraculous recovery and introduces himself as Balor, a Progron scientist who has achieved immortality. Unfortunately, Balor is also a dangerous psychopath who lives for the pleasure of inflicting fear and pain. He requests that Koenig allow him free reign to terrorise the Alphans, promising to use his powers of regeneration to keep them alive indefinately for his eternal amusement, but Koenig refuses so Balor embarks on a rampage of death and destruction…

Screenplay by Johnny Byrne

Directed by Ray Austin

Filming Schedule: Wednesday, 9th – Wednesday, 23rd October 1974

Original UK Airdate: Thursday, 20th November 1975 (ATV)

Edited by Derek Hyde Chambers

Notes:

In the asteroid, Koenig clearly calls Baxter “Jim,” but the character’s name is Mike – Jim is the name of the actor playing him!

Once again, much of the incidental music is composed of electronic scores from the Chappell Recorded Music Library: “Experiments In Space – Malus” and “Experiments In Space – Dorado” by Robert Farnon, “Stratosphere” by David Snell, and “Videotronics No. 3” and “Cosmic Sounds No. 1”, both by Roger Roger (aka Cecil Leuter) and George Teperino (aka Nino Nardini).

Additional Cast:

  • Balor Peter Bowles
  • Mike Baxter Jim Smilie
  • Main Mission Operatives Binu Balini, Sarah Bullen,Laurie Davis, Andrew Dempsey, Raymond Harris, Jan Rennison, Michael Stevens
  • Security Guards Tony Allyn, Martin GraceQuentin Pierre, Colin Skeaping, Eddie StaceyPaul Weston
  • Astronauts Uffe Neumann, Anthony Scott
  • Medics Paul Kirby, Christopher Williams
  • Nurses Judith Hepburn, Kathy Mallory
  • Information Girl Laraine Humphreys
  • Patient Alan Harris
  • Alphan Robert Atiko
17 War Games

“The death struggle of inferior species is very often the finest hour of their existence.”

Alpha is approached by a fleet of Mark 9 Hawk Warships and, believing them to be about to attack the base, Koenig orders the Eagles to open fire. Suddenly, the Alphans are fighting a war against alien forces that devastate the base leaving it uninhabitable. With 128 dead, Koenig’s only hope for his people is to seek peaceful co-existence with the enemy, so he and Helena journey to their planet to plead their case. They meet two remote aliens who refuse their request on the grounds that the Alphans carry contaminants which would destroy a civilisation that has lasted for billions of years. Helena is held captive by the aliens while Koenig returns to Alpha to prepare for an invasion…

Screenplay by Christopher Penfold

Directed by Charles Crichton

Filming Schedule: Thursday, October 24th – Thursday, November 7th 1974

Original UK Airdate: Thursday, September 25th 1975 (ATV)

Edited by Alan Killick

Notes:

The Alien Bomber was previously seen in Alpha Child and appears again in both The Last Enemy and Dragon’s Domain.

Writer Christopher Penfold describes War Games as the best episode that he wrote for the series.

Koenig reveals that he is the ninth commander of Moonbase Alpha.

The incidental music for the battle sequence is supplied by a piece from the Chappell Recorded Music Library, “The Astronauts” by Mike Hankinson.

Additional Cast:

  • Male Alien Anthony Valentine
  • Female Alien Isla Blair
  • Ken Johnson James Fagan
  • Main Mission Operatives Binu Balini, Sarah Bullen,Andrew Dempsey, Raymond Harris
  • Alphans Robert Atiko, Paul Weston
18 The Last Enemy

“What the hell have we got ourselves into?”

When the Moon falls into an orbit that places it directly between two planets on opposing sides of their sun, a huge spacecraft from the planet Betha takes up a position on the Moon and begins to launch an offensive on the other planet, Delta. The Alphans soon realise that the two planets are at war, and that their relative positions make it impossible for them to fire directly at each other, but now the Moon has provided the Bethans with the ideal gun platform. Missiles from Delta apparently destroy the Bethan craft, but an escape vehicle makes its way to Alpha and the occupant, the Bethan commander Dione, seeks asylum on the base. When a Deltan battlecruiser takes up position on the Moon to launch an offensive on Betha, Koenig desperately attempts to negotiate a cease-fire, but the cunning Dione has other plans…

Screenplay by Bob Kellett

Directed by Bob Kellett

Filming Schedule:

  • Friday, 8th – Tuesday, 19th November 1974
  • Tuesday, 25th – Thursday, 27th February 1975

Original UK Airdate: Thursday, 19th February 1976 (ATV)

Edited by Derek Hyde Chambers

Original Titles: “The Second Sex”, “The Other Enemy”

Notes:

The Last Enemy was reportedly based on an idea by Barbara Bain who suggested the scenario as a metaphor for the ‘war of the sexes’ – she talked the idea over with director Bob Kellett who worked it into the finished script.

Some of the incidental music is culled from the Chappell Recorded Music Library, specifically “Cosmic Sounds No. 3” by George Teperino (aka Nino Nardini).

Additional Cast:

  • Dione Caroline Mortimer
  • Theia Maxine Audley
  • Talos Kevin Stoney
  • First Girl Carolyn Courage
  • Second Girl Linda Hooks
  • Third Girl Tara Faraday
  • Main Mission Operatives Sarah Bullen, Laurie DavisAndrew Dempsey, Raymond Harris, Claire Lutter, Michael Stevens
  • Security Guards Tony Allyn, Robert CaseQuentin Pierre
  • Voice of Eagle Pilot Shane Rimmer
19 The Troubled Spirit

“It’s here now. In this place. It’s waiting to kill again – to kill us all!”

While attempting to communicate telepathically with his plants, botanist Dan Mateo collapses and a strange force sweeps through the base. Investigating, Koenig learns that Mateo believes that man has some affinity with plants, an affinity that can be exploited by tapping into certain wave patterns in the human brain that are identical to those generated by plant life. Mateo quickly recovers, but is forbidden from conducting any further experiments by hydroponics head Dr. Warren. A heated argument ensues and later Warren is confronted by a horribly scarred ghost figure that oddly resembles Mateo. Warren is found dead shortly after and Bergman realises that Alpha is being terrorised by a psychic manifestation which seeks atonement for a death which has yet to take place!

Screenplay by Johnny Byrne

Directed by Ray Austin

Filming Schedule: Wednesday, 20th November – Wednesday, 4th December 1974

Original UK Airdate: Saturday, 5th January 1976 (ATV)

Edited by Alan Killick

Notes:

The distinctive sitar music which features prominently in this episode was specially composed and recorded for Space:1999 by Jim Sullivan, the artist seen performing the sitar recital in the pre-credits sequence.

Giancarlo Prete was the first of four Italian guest actors to be cast in the series to fulfil the terms of the co-financing contract between ITC and RAI. Each well-known in their native Italy but unheard of by audiences in the UK and the USA, the others were Carla Romanelli (in Space Brain), Gianni Garko (in Dragon’s Domain) and Orso Maria Guerrini (in The Testament Of Arkadia). Prete and Romanelli both also guested in Return Of The Saint when a similar deal was struck between ITC and RAI to co-finance that series too.

The Bassett Sweet Cigarette card of this episode (No.42) was withdrawn from circulation shortly after issue following complaints about its depiction of the scarred Mateo – consequently it is extremely rare and valuable to collectors.

Additional Cast:

  • Dan Mateo Giancarlo Prete
  • Laura Adams Hilary Dwyer
  • James Warren Anthony Nicholls
  • Operative Kate Sarah Bullen
  • Spirit Mateo Val Musetti
  • Sitarist Jim Sullivan
  • Main Mission Operatives Binu Balini, Sarah BullenLoftus Burton, Andrew Dempsey
  • Security Guards Tony Allyn, Quentin Pierre
  • Botanists Vernon Morris, Xanthi Gardner
  • Medic Christopher Williams
  • Nurses Jeannie Galston, Judith Hepburn, Jan Rennison
  • Technicians Robert Atiko, Eddy Nedari,Richard Shore
20 Space Brain

“What’s happening? You must not touch my brain!”

Alien hieroglyphics appear on all of Alpha’s screens and an Eagle sent to investigate their origin becomes covered by a white glutinous substance. Contact with the Eagle is lost, but after a small meteorite impacts on the lunar surface, analysis reveals it to be the compacted remains of the Eagle and its two pilots. Meanwhile, Carter has set out in a second Eagle in search of the first and when his co-pilot Kelly spacewalks in the vicinity of the Eagle’s disappearance he too is covered by the glutinous substance. Carter recovers Kelly’s body, but the pilot has become a conduit for a huge alien space brain that is attempting to communicate with the Alphans. Unable to understand its messages and with Alpha on a collision course, Koenig has no choice but to attempt to destroy the brain with nuclear explosives…

Screenplay by Christopher Penfold

Directed by Charles Crichton

Filming Schedule:

  • Thursday, 5th – Thursday, 19th December 1974
  • Thursday, 27th – Friday, 28th February 1975

Original UK Airdate: Thursday, 29th January 1976 (ATV)

Edited by Derek Hyde Chambers

Notes:

Space Brain features the longest pre-credits sequence of any Space:1999 episode, lasting well over seven minutes.

The incidental music that accompanies the Cosmic Intelligence’s anti-body bombardment is an arrangement by Malcolm Sargent of Gustav Holst’s “Mars, Bringer Of War” from “The Planets” suite.

This episode contains the very last scenes shot for the series, as two additional days of filming on Space Brain were added to the series’ already over-extended production schedule after filming was completed on episode 24, The Testament of Arkadia.

Additional Cast:

  • Kelly Shane Rimmer
  • Melita Kelly Carla Romanelli
  • Wayland Derek Anders
  • Main Mission Operatives Sarah Bullen, Loftus Burton,The Infernal Machine“To attempt to preserve your personality is the ultimate vanity.”

    A strange craft appears over Moonbase Alpha and a voice appeals for help and permission to land. Koenig, Helena and Bergman reluctantly accept an invitation to visit the craft, where they meet an old man who calls himself ‘Companion’. Companion requests supplies for Gwent, the owner of the voice, which is revealed to be the ship itself, a cybernetic man/machine combination. Helena realises that Companion requires urgent medical attention, but Gwent refuses to allow them to return to Alpha and Companion collapses and dies. Gwent becomes enraged, blaming Companion’s death on the Alphans, imprisoning them in the ship and demanding that the trio should replace the old man…

    Screenplay by Anthony Terpiloff, Elizabeth Barrows

    Directed by David Tomblin

    Filming Schedule:

    • Friday, 20th – Tuesday, 24th December 1974
    • Monday, 30th – 31st Tuesday, December 1974
    • Thursday, 2nd – Thursday, 9th January 1975

    Original UK Airdate: Thursday, 8th January 1976 (ATV)

    Edited by Alan Killick

    Notes:

    Having completed his stint on Barry Lyndon(1975), director David Tomblin returned to the series with this episode.

    Actor Prentis Hancock (Morrow) was replaced for this episode by Gary Waldhorn (Winters). Morrow is said to be recovering from fractured ribs and a broken ankle – in fact, Hancock was undergoing emergency surgery for a growth on his neck.

    The Gwent spacecraft model caused endless frustration for visual effects supervisor Brian Johnson who destroyed the model by hurling it across the studio once filming on the episode was completed.

    The episode again employs scores from the Chappell Recorded Music Library for the incidental music: “Outer Space” by Robert Farnon, “Lunar Landscape” by Roger Roger, “Mission Control” by Harry Sosnik, “The Monsters” by Ivo Vyhnalek, “Dark Suspense No. 1” by Beda Folten and “Subterranean” by Joe Venuto. One very distinctive piece (accompanying Winters’ attack on Gwent) was originally composed and recorded for the Thunderbirdsepisode Terror In New York City.

    Additional Cast:

    • Companion/Voice of Gwent Leo McKern
    • Winters Gary Waldhorn
    • Main Mission Operatives Sarah Bullen, Loftus Burton,Andrew Dempsey, Michael Stevens, Andrew Sutcliffe
    • Security Guards Tony Allyn, Quentin Pierre

    Laurie Davis, Jacqueline Delhaye, Andrew Dempsey, Michael Stevens

  • Security Guards Tony Allyn, Quentin Pierre
  • Technicians Robert Atiko, Michael Sirett
  • Nurses Judith Hepburn, Diana Reeves, Erica Svenson
  • Patient Carol Dee
  • Alphans Marc Boyle, Joe Dunne, Dorothy Ford, Eddie Stacey
21 The Infernal Machine

“To attempt to preserve your personality is the ultimate vanity.”

A strange craft appears over Moonbase Alpha and a voice appeals for help and permission to land. Koenig, Helena and Bergman reluctantly accept an invitation to visit the craft, where they meet an old man who calls himself ‘Companion’. Companion requests supplies for Gwent, the owner of the voice, which is revealed to be the ship itself, a cybernetic man/machine combination. Helena realises that Companion requires urgent medical attention, but Gwent refuses to allow them to return to Alpha and Companion collapses and dies. Gwent becomes enraged, blaming Companion’s death on the Alphans, imprisoning them in the ship and demanding that the trio should replace the old man…

Screenplay by Anthony Terpiloff, Elizabeth Barrows

Directed by David Tomblin

Filming Schedule:

  • Friday, 20th – Tuesday, 24th December 1974
  • Monday, 30th – 31st Tuesday, December 1974
  • Thursday, 2nd – Thursday, 9th January 1975

Original UK Airdate: Thursday, 8th January 1976 (ATV)

Edited by Alan Killick

Notes:

Having completed his stint on Barry Lyndon (1975), director David Tomblin returned to the series with this episode.

Actor Prentis Hancock (Morrow) was replaced for this episode by Gary Waldhorn (Winters). Morrow is said to be recovering from fractured ribs and a broken ankle – in fact, Hancock was undergoing emergency surgery for a growth on his neck.

The Gwent spacecraft model caused endless frustration for visual effects supervisor Brian Johnson who destroyed the model by hurling it across the studio once filming on the episode was completed.

The episode again employs scores from the Chappell Recorded Music Library for the incidental music: “Outer Space” by Robert Farnon, “Lunar Landscape” by Roger Roger, “Mission Control” by Harry Sosnik, “The Monsters” by Ivo Vyhnalek, “Dark Suspense No. 1” by Beda Folten and “Subterranean” by Joe Venuto. One very distinctive piece (accompanying Winters’ attack on Gwent) was originally composed and recorded for the Thunderbirds episode Terror In New York City.

Additional Cast:

  • Companion/Voice of Gwent Leo McKern
  • Winters Gary Waldhorn
  • Main Mission Operatives Sarah Bullen, Loftus BurtonAndrew Dempsey, Michael Stevens, Andrew Sutcliffe
  • Security Guards Tony Allyn, Quentin Pierre
22 Mission of the Darians

“You can’t justify using the living bodies of your own people to survive!”

Alpha receives an SOS from a colossal spaceship, the S.S. Daria, twenty miles long and five miles wide, and Koenig leads a rescue party of six on board. Separated into three groups, the Alphans discover a vast world of startling contrasts, the result of the explosion of the ship’s nuclear reactor 900 years before. While Koenig and Bergman meet the sophisticated and intellectual original Darians whose lives have been prolonged by transplant surgery, the rest of the party encounter the savage descendants of the survivors of Level 7 whose religious beliefs reward imperfection with execution!

Screenplay by Johnny Byrne

Directed by Ray Austin

Filming Schedule: Friday, 10th – Friday, 24th January 1975

Original UK Airdate: Thursday, 30th October 1975 (ATV)

Edited by Derek Hyde Chambers

Notes:

Actor Paul Antrim (Bill Lowry) actually owns a full set of fingers – a ‘hand double’ was used for the close-up shot of Lowry’s hand. Oddly, this close-up is the only scene in the entire series that was edited from the Japanese laser disc releases.

The spacesuit worn by the Darian ‘spirit’ originally appeared in the British space western feature Moon Zero Two (1969).

The model of the S.S. Daria was later revamped to appear as Space Station Delta in Gerry Anderson’s The Day After Tomorrow TV pilot.

The distinctive incidental music heard in the episode comprises the introduction from “The White Mountain” by Frank Cordell and “Experiments In Space – Vega” by Robert Farnon, both tracks from the Chappell Recorded Music Library. Some of the music was also originally composed and recorded by Barry Gray for the Stingray episode Ghost Of The Sea and the Joe 90 episode King For A Day.

Additional Cast:

  • Kara Joan Collins
  • Neman Dennis Burgess
  • High Priest Aubrey Morris
  • Lowry Paul Antrim
  • Hadin Robert Russell
  • Male Mute Gerald Stadden
  • Female Mute Jackie Horton
  • Hirsute Darian Guard Ron Tarr
  • Blonde Darian Girl Linda Hooks
  • Main Mission Operatives Bina Balini, Sarah BullenLoftus Burton, Andrew Dempsey, Michael Stevens
23 Dragon's Domain

“Something happened out there beyond Ultra – something neither you nor I can understand.”

Tony Cellini experiences a strange visitation and attempts to steal an Eagle. The incident encourages Helena to review Earth medical records concerning Cellini’s involvement in the ill-fated Ultra Probe mission of 1996. Cellini and three science experts had been dispatched to investigate a new planet, Ultra, but Cellini was the only survivor of the mission. On his return, he related a fantastic story about a spaceship graveyard guarded by a horrific creature which killed his companions. The disbelieving authorities rejected Cellini’s tale and he has lived with the nightmare for the last five years. Now, incredibly, the Moon has arrived at Cellini’s spaceship graveyard and he senses the presence of the monster guardian…

Screenplay by Christopher Penfold

Directed by Charles Crichton

Filming Schedule: Monday, 27th January – Monday, 10th February, 1975

Original UK Airdate: Thursday, 23rd October, 1975 (ATV)

Edited by Alan Killick

Notes:

Christopher Penfold originally wrote this episode to feature Alan Carter as the former captain of the Ultra Probe.

The incidental music that accompanies the flight of the Ultra Probe is an arrangement by Allain Lombard of “Adagio for Organ and Cello in G Minor” by Tomaso Albinoni, from the Delysé Envoy production music catalogue.

The painting on the wall in Tony Cellini’s apartment is “Wise Old Elephant”, painted in 1962 by David Shepherd. Despite the publishers’ initial reluctance to publish prints of the work, “Wise Old Elephant” was one of the ten top selling prints for three years running, on two occasions proving more popular than Constable’s “Hay Wain” or Canaletti’s pictures of Venice.

This is the only Year One episode other than Breakaway that is specifically dated: February 6th, 2002. The date of the launch of the Ultra Probe is detailed by Helena as June 6th, 1996 (12:00 hours) – odd then that in the previous scene with Koenig and Cellini coming to an agreement over who should pilot the mission, the “Space News” newsreader clearly gives the date as September 3rd, 1996!

Additional Cast:

  • Tony Cellini Gianni Garko
  • Commissioner Dixon Douglas Wilmer
  • Monique Bouchere Barbara Kellerman
  • Darwin King Michael Sheard
  • Professor Juliet Mackie Susan Jameson
  • Ken Johnson James Fagan
  • Space News Newsreader Bob Sherman
  • Nurse Gwen Taylor
  • Main Mission Operatives Sarah Bullen, Loftus BurtonAndrew Dempsey, Michael Stevens, Andrew Sutcliffe
  • Security Guards Tony Allyn, Quentin Pierre
24 The Testament of Arkadia

“Heed now the Testament of Arkadia. You who are guided here, make us fertile. Help us live again.”

The Moon stops dead in space and Alpha experiences an unexplained power loss which will render the base uninhabitable within days. Investigating an emanation from the lifeless world of Arkadia, the Alphans discover a cave containing human skeletons and a message written in Sanskrit 25,000 years before. Trees on the planet which are native to Earth confirm the content of the ancient writings, that life on Earth began on Arkadia, but Koenig does not believe that the planet offers a new home for the Alphans and he cancels evacuation procedures. However, Luke Ferro and Anna Davis are determined to carry out the wishes of their distant forbears and take matters into their own hands: holding Helena hostage they demand supplies and an Eagle to transport them back to Arkadia…

Screenplay by Johnny Byrne

Directed by David Tomblin

Filming Schedule: Tuesday, 11th – Tuesday, 25th February, 1975

Original UK Airdate: Thursday, February 12th, 1976 (ATV)

Edited by Derek Hyde Chambers

Notes:

Barry Morse, Prentis Hancock and Clifton Jones make their final appearances in Space:1999 in this episode.

Between the start of filming on Breakaway and the completion of The Testament Of Arkadia, filming on Year One took exactly fifteen months. Filming resumed on Year Two ten months later, in January 1976.

Two distinctive pieces of incidental music from the Chappell Recorded Music Library appear on the soundtrack: “Suite Appassionata – Adagio” by Paul Bonneau & Serge Lancen and “Picture Of Autumn” by Jack Arel and Pierre Dutour.

Additional Cast:

  • Luke Ferro Orso Maria Guerrini
  • Anna Davis Lisa Harrow
  • Main Mission Operatives Ann Maj-Britt, Sarah BullenLoftus Burton, Andrew Dempsey, Michael Stevens, Andrew Sutcliffe
  • Security Guards Tony Allyn, Quentin Pierre
  • Voice of Operative Shane Rimmer
Cast List
Commander John Koenig Martin Landau
Dr. Helena Russell Barbara Bain
Professor Victor Bergman Barry Morse
Sandra Benes Zienia Merton
David Kano Clifton Jones
Dr. Bob Mathias Anton Phillips
Paul Morrow Prentis Hancock
Tanya Alexander Suzanne Roquette
Captain Alan Carter Nick Tate